CHAPTER 11: SPAYING AND NEUTERING

General 

 

  • All surgeries must be done by or under the direct supervision of a veterinarian.

  • As part of a binding contract between the rescue group and adopter, rescue animals should not be bred. 

  • Consideration be given to individual animal health or circumstances when it comes to creating the need for an exception to the organization’s spay/neuter policy. 

  • Policies for managing complications and emergencies that occur within 48 hours after surgery must be in place. 

  • Spaying pregnant animals should be left to the discretion of the organization’s veterinarian. 

 

UNACCEPTABLE 

 

  • Rescue animals must not be allowed to breed. 

 

Resources

 

Makolinski K. V. Chapter 37: Spay/Neuter Services for Shelter and Community Animals. In: Miller L, Zawistowski S. (eds). Shelter Medicine for Veterinarians and Staff. Second Edition, Ames, IA: Blackwell Publishing, 2013.

 

Appel L., Scarlett J. Chapter 40: Pediatric Neutering. In: Miller L, Zawistowski S. (eds). Shelter Medicine for Veterinarians and Staff. Second Edition, Ames, IA: Blackwell Publishing, 2013.

 

Oban P.N., Root Kustritz M.V., Johnston S.D. Early-age neutering of dogs and cays in the United States (a review). Journal of Reproduction and Fertility Supplement 57, 223-232. 2001.

 

Spain C.V., Scarlett J.M., Houpt K.A. Long-term risks and benefits of early-age gonadectomy in cats. JAVMA, Vol 224, No.3, February 1, 2004.

 

Spain C.V., Scarlett J.M., Houpt K.A. Long-term risks and benefits of early-age gonadectomy in dogs. JAVMA, Vol 224, No.3, February 1, 2004.
 

 
 
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